Jump Blues

Últimas Entradas

Tracklist:01. Chicken Shack Boogie [00:02:33] 02. One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer [00:03:16] 03. Rock Rock Rock [00:02:40] 04. Soft Pillow [00:02:20] 05. I’m Gonna Tell My Mama [00:02:52] 06. Roomin’ House Boogie [00:02:47] 07. Bad, Bad Whiskey [00:02:58] 08. Down the Road Apiece [00:03:05] 09. Roll Mr. Jelly [00:02:43] 10. Johnson Rag [00:02:40] 11. Greyhound [00:03:08] 12. Let Me ...

Tracklist: A1 Blow Big Jay     A2 Road House Boogie     A3 Willie The Cool Cat     A4 Midnight Dreams     A5 Hoppin’ With Hunter     A6 K & H Boogie     A7 Gingercake     A8 Boogie In Front     B1 Junie Flip     B2 Jaysfrantic     B3 Real Crazy Cool     B4 Tondalayo     B5 Deac’s Blowout     B6 ...

Review by Myles Boisen Here’s another must for sax instrumental buffs, with rare wax by Texas tenor Clifford Scott and balladeer Lynn Hope. You and a few million others heard Scott on Bill Doggett’s classic “Honky Tonk”; here he is joined by organist Hank Marr, Charles Brown on piano, and other session cookers for five solid shufflin’ sides. Lynn Hope ...

Charles Williams Higgins (April 17, 1924 – September 14, 1999) was an American saxophonist. Higgins, who was noted for mixing elements of Latin Jazz with Blues, recorded in Los Angeles during the mid-fifties, notably for the Specialty, Combo and Doo-Tone labels, and is best remembered for the song “Pachuko Hop”. Higgins relocated from his birthplace of Gary, Indiana to Los ...

Review by Stephen Cook Tenor saxophonist Big Jay McNeely swings and honks his way through 12 classic Federal sides from 1952-1954. Joined by brother Robert on baritone, McNeely and his combo work a well-worn jump blues groove on gospel-imbued scorchers like “Hot Cinders” and “The Goof.” Equally adept at torrid and moderate tempos, McNeely also shows off his Illinois Jacquet-inspired ...

Edwin Leon Chamblee (24 February 1920 – 1 May 1999), known as Eddie “Long Gone” Chamblee, was an American tenor and alto saxophonist, and occasional vocalist, who played jazz and R&B. He was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and grew up in Chicago where he began learning the saxophone at the age of 12. After leaving Wendell Phillips High School, he ...

Biography With his instrumental hit “Honky Tonk” in February 1956, Bill Doggett (born William Ballard Doggett) created one of rock’s greatest instrumental tracks. Although it generated scores of offers to perform in rock & roll clubs throughout the United States, Doggett remained tied to the jazz and organ-based R&B that he had performed since the 1930s. Continuing to record for ...

Tracklist 1 – Bill’s Honky Tonk 4:00 2 – Pots A Cookin’ 5:18 3 – I Wish You Love 4:15 4 – Dig The Thing 5:27 5 – Dug’s Pad 4:39 6 – Midnight Sun 2:48 7 – Flying Home 7:52 8 – Charlie’s Alley 3:58 Credits Alto Saxophone – Charles Williams , Norris Turney Bass – Larry Troit Drums ...

The Ram Series continues with a fine collection of blues and R&B recordings, highlighted by the complete sessions of the late Jeff (Sonny Boy) Williamson – the only known recording of this Louisiana harp player. The tiny Shreveport Ram label was the brainchild of the late Myra Smith who, in the mid-50s, recorded country rockabilly and blues at her tiny ...

Review by Richie Unterberger Just the first paragraph of the liner notes to this CD is enough to make you wonder why Herb Hardesty isn’t in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in the sideman category, as he played saxophone on numerous Fats Domino classics including “I’m Walkin’,” “Blue Monday,” and “The Fat Man” (as well as Lloyd Price’s ...

Charlie Singleton was a New York City-based saxophonist and bandleader who worked in a jump blues/R&B vein during the late ’40s and early ’50s. During his tenure with Atlas Records; one of the first New York based, Black owned independent record labels of the early fifties, Charlie recorded a number of highly influential jump blues instrumentals and also backed many ...

Review by Scott Yanow Sammy Price had such a flexible piano style that he could fit into swing, boogie-woogie, blues, R&B, and rock & roll settings without altering his approach. During 1956, 1957, and 1959, Price led a series of blues-oriented instrumental jams featuring some notable sidemen in his quintet/sextet, including at various times tenor saxophonist King Curtis, guitarists Mickey ...

Price, a delightful, romping pianist in the vintage barrelhouse and boogie-woogie genres, interpreted, reworked, and remade a series of traditional blues and jazz tunes on this fine 1975 release. Everything, from song selection to solos, is wonderful. 1 – My blue heaven 2 – Saint James infirmary 3 – Gee baby, ain’t I good to you 4 – Sunday 5 ...

Translate »