Saxophone Jazz

Últimas Entradas

Review by Michael G. Nastos As an originator of the initial soul-funk movement of the ’60s when he was with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, Golson is eminently qualified to funkify jazz and R&B-flavored instrumental music. Nat Adderley plays cornet alongside Golson’s tenor in this, one of his last recordings before he passed away. Always fresh and deep in the groove ...

Review by Stephen Cook Backed by some of the top bop players of the day, Al Cohn stretches out here for a program heavy with up-tempo swingers. Cut in two sessions during 1950 and 1953, Cohn’s Tones finds the usually more mellow tenor great feeding off the driving drum work of both Tiny Kahn and Max Roach. Besides the ballad ...

Musty Rusty is an album by jazz saxophonist Lou Donaldson recorded for the Cadet label in 1965 and performed by Donaldson with Bill Hardman, Billy Gardner, Grant Green, and Ben Dixon. A1 Musty Rusty Written-By – Lou Donaldson 6:03 A2 Midnight Sun Written-By – Lionel Hampton, J. Francis Burke 4:45 A3 Hipty Hop Written-By – Lou Donaldson 5:20 B1 The ...

Review by Matt Collar A project long in the making, Across the Tracks finds tenor saxophonist Scott Hamilton pairing with journeyman blues guitarist Duke Robillard for a set of burnished lesser-known standards, ballads, and blues. As Rhode Island natives, Hamilton and Robillard crossed paths early on in their careers, with the younger Hamilton drawing inspiration for his own straight-ahead jazz ...

Review by Myles Boisen Here’s another must for sax instrumental buffs, with rare wax by Texas tenor Clifford Scott and balladeer Lynn Hope. You and a few million others heard Scott on Bill Doggett’s classic “Honky Tonk”; here he is joined by organist Hank Marr, Charles Brown on piano, and other session cookers for five solid shufflin’ sides. Lynn Hope ...

Review by Richard S. Ginell As specifically indicated by the album’s title, the title tune’s bluesy cast, and Sweet Lou Donaldson’s own determined liner notes, this CD aims to strike a blow for soul-jazz, a once-popular, then-maligned idiom newly returned from exile. That it does — with no frills, no apologies, and an idiomatic supporting cast. For Donaldson, it was ...

Editorial Reviews Second installment in this four volume series from the celebrated jazzmen with deep Blues roots, a prolific musical team with exquisite chemistry. Volume Two includes the two complete albums Joe’s Blues and Wings & Things, in which guitarist Grant Green plays with the two masters. Lonehill.

The Three Sounds were pianist Gene Harris, bassist Andy Simpkins, and drummer Bill Dowdy, and they swung in-the-pocket. Although they were not as acclaimed as the Modern Jazz Quartet, the Ramsey Lewis Trio, and other marquee combos, their streamlined sound bridged Count Basie and bebop into a modern yet grooving sensibility. This two-CD set features the trio’s entire 1960 Blue ...

Review by Richie Unterberger Just the first paragraph of the liner notes to this CD is enough to make you wonder why Herb Hardesty isn’t in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in the sideman category, as he played saxophone on numerous Fats Domino classics including “I’m Walkin’,” “Blue Monday,” and “The Fat Man” (as well as Lloyd Price’s ...

Review by Richard S. Ginell Fresh from the sudden success of Jazz Samba and “Desafinado,” Stan Getz asked the 28-year-old, strikingly gifted Gary McFarland to arrange a bossa nova album for big band as a follow-up. Getz is always his debonair, wistful, freely-floating self, completely at home in the Brazilian idiom that he’d adopted only a few months before. McFarland ...

Review by Steve Huey One of the biggest hit jazz LPs of the post-rock & roll era, Eddie Harris’ Exodus to Jazz seemed to come completely out of left field. It was the debut album by a previously unknown artist from an under-publicized scene in Chicago, and it was released on the primarily R&B-oriented Vee Jay label, which had originally ...

Saxophonist Sam Butera is best known for the time he spent backing Louis Prima and Keely Smith. He started his career in New Orleans, but moved to Las Vegas in the early 50’s when Louis Prima called his brother desperately needing a band to back him at The Sahara’s Casbar Lounge. Leaving behind the Shim Sham club and New Orleans, ...

Translate »