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Review by Scott Yanow Latin Concert is a pretty good sampling of vibraphonist Cal Tjader’s influential Latin jazz of the 1950s. With pianist Vince Guaraldi, bassist Al McKibbon, Willie Bobo on timbales and drums, and the congas of Mongo Santamaria, Tjader’s impressive unit performs four of his catchy originals and two by Santamaria in addition to Latinized versions of “The ...

Tracklist: A1 – Walk On The Wild Side    A2 – I Left My Heart In San Francisco    A3 – Sly Me To The Moon    A4 – New Delhi    A5 – Valerie    A6 – A Taste Of Honey    B1 – On Green Dolphin Street    B2-  Theme From 9073    B3 – Moon River    B4 – Anna    B5 – John Brown’s Battle Hymn ...

1) The One I Love 05:59 2) Tea For Two 03:51 3) I’ll Be Around 03:56 4) A Short One For Santa Monica 01:56 5) Blues For Wrva 03:34 6) Green Dolphin Street 05:10 7) Don’t Blame Me 04:38 8) Runnin’ Wild 04:53 Credits: Red Norvo(vib) Hank Jones(p) 1-4 Milt Hinton(b) 1-4 Jo Jones(ds) 1-4 Jimmy Rowles(p) 5–8 Lloyd Ellis(g) ...

Review by Richard Mortifoglio This 1955 date is an intriguing opportunity to hear Milt Jackson accompanied by the MJQ rhythm section, but with hard bopper Horace Silver substituting for John Lewis. Not only that, it’s also a chance to hear a hitherto unknown, lushly romantic side of both Jackson and Silver, two blues-oriented players who rarely if ever recorded standards ...

Tommy Gumina was one of the few brave souls to follow Art Van Damme’s lead and explore the jazz accordion. Gumina is best remembered for his innovative collaborations with clarinetist Buddy DeFranco on their quartet recordings of the early 1960s. Gumina joined Harry James’ scaled-down band in 1951 and toured with James for the next two years. He then struck ...

Pianist Monty Alexander had first appeared on a Milt Jackson record in 1969. Soul Fusion songs Eight years later the great vibraphonist used Alexander’s trio (which included bassist John Clayton and drummer Jeff Hamilton, future big-band co-leaders) for this spirited Pablo session that was subsequently reissued on CD through Original Jazz Classics. Soul Fusion album for sale Much of the ...

In the 1960s, vibist Johnny Lytle was arguably the Milt Jackson of soul-jazz — or perhaps the Cal Tjader of soul-jazz. Jackson and Tjader both influenced his vibraphone playing, as did Lionel Hampton. But Lytle had a recognizable sound of his own — one that proved to be perfect for soul-jazz and organ combos. Two of the fine soul-jazz/hard bop ...

Editorial Reviews Two lost smokers from the man Lionel Hampton called “The greatest vibes player in the world,” Johnny Lytle both very different from anything else he ever recorded! 1971’s The Soulful Rebel has a great blend of Hammond and Fender Rhodes along with the vibes soaring out in a massively funky sextet with bass from Ron Carter and congas ...

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